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24th Alaska State Legislature
The 24th Alaska State Legislature
Alaska State Senator Ralph Seekins
Sponsor Statement

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Executive Branch Ethics and Legislative Ethics/Meetings
Sponsor Statements for SB 186 and SB 187
Alaska State Legislature
Alaska State Legislature
Attachments Attachments

 
Released:
May 7, 2005
Updated:
February 19, 2012


"An Act relating to the Alaska Executive Branch Ethics Act; and providing for an effective date. "


"An Act relating to legislative ethics open meetings guidelines, to the public members of the Select Committee on Legislative Ethics, to alternate members of the legislative subcommittees, to advisory opinions, and to confidential information and proceedings regarding legislative ethics complaints and investigations. "


"In summary, Alaska's ethics code applies not just to a handful of individuals but to 15,000+ state employees. It seems we should be keeping this in mind when we look at designing a system that not only seeks fairness to the individual employee but also justice for the public at large. Senate Bills 186 and 187 implements a number of features which are intended to accomplish these dual purposes in a straightforward fashion."
- Sen. Seekins

 

There has been much discussion throughout the Capitol hallways and committee rooms regarding ethics laws. The Senate Judiciary Committee, in particular, has taken great interest and much testimony on this important topic. Over the last three months a substantial amount of research has been conducted on ethical treatises and other states' ethics laws. Furthermore, CPAs, judges and employment law attorneys have been interviewed along with legislators from around the country. This effort has resulted in the introduction of two bills - SB 186 & 187 - designed to improve the Executive and Legislative Code of Ethics, respectively.

Senate Bill 186 revises the Executive Branch Code of Ethics. The terms "substantial" and "insignificant" defy clear definition and consequently are removed from AS 39.52.110(b). Furthermore, this section gains key language outlining specific types of personal or financial activity which the public employee should take into consideration prior to taking official action on matters which could create a conflict.

Of particular note is the inclusion of a recommendation originating from the Bundy Report pertaining to stock ownership. Here, the limiting factors are one percent with a total value of less than $10,000. This section also includes new language detailing methods by which the public official can avoid even the slightest perception of impropriety. This can be accomplished through the placement of financial assets into a blind trust or other instrument in which the official has no management control.

Two new terms are brought into use throughout AS 39.52 - "business associate" and "household". These terms are intended to better define close relationships maintained by the state employee particularly as these relationships affect, or are affected by, action taken by the employee in his or her official capacity.

State law currently sets out two remedial options available to a supervisor when a determination has been made that an ethics violation could exist or will occur. Currently, the supervisor could either reassign the employee or require divesture of the financial interest creating the potential conflict. Senate Bill 186 provides a logical third option. That is to place the financial interest into a blind trust or other investment tool whereby the employee has no management control.

Recent experience has highlighted a significant procedural ambiguity existing in current statute pertaining to a potential violation involving the governor, lieutenant governor or attorney general. Senate Bill 186 clarifies this by adding language spelling out a clear procedural path to be followed in the unlikely event this situation should arise in the future.

Senate Bill 186 proposes that in a case involving the governor or lieutenant governor, the attorney general refers the matter to the personnel board which appoints an independent counsel to investigate. Results of the investigation are submitted to the attorney general, via written report, who then makes a determination as to whether a violation has occurred. If so, then the report is automatically converted to a complaint and forwarded to the personnel board for resolution.

In a case involving the attorney general, it is the governor that refers the matter to the personnel board at which point the same procedure as that described in the previous paragraph is followed. Of course, in this case the written report is then submitted back to the governor who makes the determination as to the necessity for further action through the personnel board.

One feature common to both Senate Bill 186 and 187 has received much attention. That is the civil fine of up to $5,000 which could be levied on an individual for violating confidentiality requirements. This provision will not discourage people with righteous complaints from coming forward and making them. It will remind people with less than pure intent that there are legal requirements to abide by and liabilities attached to violations.

Our ethics statutes recognize the paramount importance of maintaining the presumption of innocence prior to any finding of probable cause being made. Current state law explicitly requires members of the State Personnel Board and the Select Committee on Legislative Ethics, and others assisting in an investigation, to maintain confidentiality. Why is this? Why should they be bound to this ethic? The clear answer to this question lies in the moral responsibility of fairness our system of justice provides to the accused during the investigatory pursuit of truth.

We must remember that when investigating an ethics complaint, it is no less than the subject's reputation which is at stake. An adverse finding could negatively affect an individual's career for years to come. But a false accusation could have the very same effect. How fair is that?

As it stands now, fair application of our ethics laws is being perverted through a parallel process of faux justice commonly known as trial by media. The fact is, where violations of ethics are alleged, it seems to be more important for a complainant to get the immediate gratification provided by a news flash than to let the Personnel Board or the Select Committee proceed with their statutory function and render a decision based on facts.

Restated, current law allows a complainant to use an ethics violation as a political hatchet. In these cases the end result is not nearly as important as the opening salvo. In fact, a complainants' entire purpose may be completely satisfied over the course of a single day's news cycle. Charged, tried and convicted in the court of public opinion. Case closed. Is this fair? Or even ethical?

If truth and justice are the complainants' pure motivating factors, then process and procedure should be welcomed along with the requisite confidentiality demanded of all parties involved. If the members of the Personnel Board and the Select Committee and others associated with an investigation must maintain confidentiality why shouldn't the complainant be required to do the same? That seems only fair.

Senate Bill 187 revises the Legislative Standards of Conduct. To start with, this bill adds succinct language which simply restates a truism - where matters of legislative procedure are concerned, the Alaska State Constitution 1 and the Uniform Rules of Procedure 2 take precedence over statute. The bill also clarifies application of the Uniform Rules of Procedure with respect to open meetings guidelines. This, too, is an explicit restatement of Constitutional authority.

With respect to the Select Committee on Legislative Ethics, Senate Bill 187 seeks to empanel public members representing a broad cross section of Alaskans. While current law does not favor a particular profession or background, practical experience suggests that, as a matter of convenience, this ideal may be somewhat overlooked. As a result, the Committee may not have the opportunity to benefit from a full range of professional and geographic experience which may otherwise be available.

Senate Bill 187 also seeks to make the Committee more efficient in another important way. It provides that alternate legislative members may attend all meetings and hearings. This allows the alternate to cast informed votes should the need arise due to the absence of a regular member.

Where advisory opinions are concerned, clarifying language is added which makes clear that if the requestor of the opinion identifies another person in the request, then that person, too, shall not only receive the opinion but also be bound by the same standard of confidentiality applying to the requestor in current law. However, the opinion may be released if all parties provide written consent.

Much of the text found in Senate Bill 187 relates directly to AS 24.60.170. This section addresses proceedings before the Committee. New subsection "s" replaces much, if not all, of the confidentiality language scattered throughout this section. Subsection "s" provides the language establishing the new link in the chain of confidentiality whereby an individual may not disclose the filing of a complaint or the intention to file a complaint, or the intention of another to file a complaint.

All proceedings and actions taken by the Committee will be confidential. All documents filed with the Committee, produced by the Committee or obtained or disclosed as result of Committee investigation, discovery, or a hearing will be confidential. However, should the Committee, after investigation, find probable cause to believe that the subject of a complaint has committed a violation that may require sanctions instead of or in addition to corrective action, then the Committee will formally charge the individual. A finding of probable cause triggers public disclosure of the complaint.

It's important to note that the subject of a complaint may waive the confidentiality requirements spelled out in subsection "s". If confidentiality is waived with respect to a meeting or proceeding, then the proceeding is open to all members of the public. If confidentiality is waived with respect to a document or other information, then the document or information is available to all members of the public.

In summary, Alaska's ethics code applies not just to a handful of individuals but to 15,000+ state employees. It seems we should be keeping this in mind when we look at designing a system that not only seeks fairness to the individual employee but also justice for the public at large. Senate Bills 186 and 187 implements a number of features which are intended to accomplish these dual purposes in a straightforward fashion.

1   Article II, Section 12
2   Rules 53 & 55 and Section 4 of Mason's Manual of Legislative Procedure, 2000 edition

# # #

 
Attachments:
 
·
Print Text Version
· Acrobat PDF Version [PDF - 3 pages - 47 KB]
· Fact Sheet [PDF - 109 KB]
· Complete Bill Text for SB 186
· Complete Bill Text for SB 187


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